Can You Drink Alcohol and Lose Fat?

We are talking about alcohol today and whether or not you should cut out alcohol to get rid of body fat.

I get this question all the time. It’s one of the most common topics that comes up. Anytime a client or a potential client reaches out to me and says, “Hey, uh, you know, I’m looking at my lifestyle and trying to make some changes and I just want to know, does alcohol make me fat?” So today I want to talk about how to manage your relationship between weight loss, fat loss, and alcohol because let’s face it, when people ask me, what do you have to lose? Do you have to cut out alcohol to lose fat? It’s not an easy question to answer necessarily because everybody’s situation is a little bit different. And we’re going to jump into some things today.

Because overall, here are my thoughts on alcohol. You don’t have to ditch alcohol to lose fat, right? From a scientific standpoint, you don’t have to, but if you do cut out excessive alcohol and excessive drinking, it will definitely help you lose fat. So without further ado, let’s jump into it.

Basics of Alcohol’s Relationship to Weight Loss

Let’s first of all cover just the basics, right? Cause there’s actually been a lot of research into alcohol and weight loss over the years and numerous studies have shown that people can consume light to moderate amounts of alcohol and not necessarily gain weight. Okay. And by the way, moderate drinking is defined as one drink a day for women and no more than two drinks a day for men. So just so we’re clear on the definition of moderate drinking. Okay, so one drink a day for women and no more than two drinks a day for men. And of course, the reason why it’s split up between men and women is just the average weight of both genders is different, right? Men typically are heavier than women, so the moderate definition becomes a little bit different when we’re comparing the genders.

Part of this is due to alcohol’s unique effect on the body. Your body can’t store alcohol and there are seven calories per gram of alcohol than alcohol brings to the table, right? So cause most people don’t even understand this basic point that alcohol does have calories, it’s more calories per gram than both carbs and protein, but less than fat because fat has nine calories per gram. Okay? So the body’s main priority is to get alcohol out of your system. Uh, there’s also a good, uh, a rather significant percentage of calories from alcohol that get burned up by your metabolism through a process called the thermic effect of food or ‘TEF’.

The thermic effect of alcohol is about 22 and a half percent, which basically puts it right on par with protein and causes proteins. TEF, the thermic effect of food is about 25% to 30% and it’s well ahead of carbohydrates because carbs are about 6% to 8%, and fat is about two to 3%.

So Now What?

Okay? So all of that is just to say that alcohol on its own won’t necessarily make or break your weight loss goals. All right? So if you enjoy a few drinks per week, it’s definitely still possible to have a highly successful fat loss process.

But here’s why alcohol might make you fat: Just because your body doesn’t store alcohol’s calories, it doesn’t mean that you can just drink however much you want and everything’s great and you know, you’re tracking calories and what-not. it’s fine when your body is processing those alcohol calories, they’re basically taking over other calories you could be burning.

So, for example, a lot of people drink and they go out and have like a burger or fries or pizza or whatever while they’re drinking. So the alcohol calories get put to the front of the line and your body makes that a priority because alcohol once again, can’t be used by the body. It’s a toxin. It’s got to get out of the body as fast as possible. So the body prioritizes alcohol, calories over food, calories.

What the Research Says

So a lot of research honestly leads to the, to the point that it’ll make it at least the leads you to believe the problem isn’t necessarily the alcohol itself. It’s what comes along with drinking, right? It’s the candy, the Twizzlers, the wings, pizza rolls, pot pockets, whatever the to eat. You know, at two in the morning when you get home from drinking, that ends up pushing your calories way too high for the day because many people who eat, or, excuse me, many people who drink alcohol have a tendency to eat more food.

There was a review published in physiology and behavior that found that drinking before or during a meal tends to increase your overall food intake. It’s also important to note that even though your body can’t store alcohol, it can and does store the calories that are mixed with the drink. For example, if you put in a margarita mix, which has about 83 grams of sugar, that can most definitely be stored inside the body as either energy or body fat.

Gameplan

So let’s talk about a game plan. What should you do in terms of alcohol? Well, the first step is to get clear on how much you’re drinking currently. So it varies, for some of you, it can be an eye-opening experience to really say “how much am I actually drinking on a weekend or week”, and you might say, “Oh, I normally drink a couple beers”, but then when you look at it, it’s like more like six to eight beers. Okay.

Heavier drinking is associated with weight gain is associated with a larger amount of belly fat. Um, as well as poor health, right? So excessive alcohol consumption is the third leading cause of premature death in the US if you’re drinking exceeds that one or two drinks per day guideline that I talked about before, then yeah, I highly suggest cutting back on alcohol just to help you lose more fat. The second thing is to pay attention to what else you do when you drink. If the occasional beer or glass of wine with friends is just that, right? Just a beer, glass of wine, then the calorie impact probably isn’t that significant. But if your drinks come with you know, late-night pizza or burgers or take out or whatever, you might have an issue on your hands. Okay. So here again it’s not so much the alcohol but cutting out alcohol can help you with better habits and routines. It can lead to less overall caloric intake.

All right, so number three. Um, number three is let’s say, let’s say you’re drinking and your appetite is under control, but you’re still not losing fat. And let’s say your drink, you know, your glass of wine every night is like a, a non-negotiable. It’s a must-have. You really want to have it. So what we should start to do then is start to offset those calories by trimming elsewhere. For example, a glass of wine is about 120 calories. Okay? A typical beer is about 150 calories, and although there are some heavier drinks out there in those categories. Like there’s some wine that’s a little bit more, there’s some beer that’s more, um, if you were to cut out 30 to 40 grams of carbs or you know, 10 to 15 grams of fat somewhere else in your meals, then that can offset those calories.

Okay. So overall, you know, when I talk about alcohol and my clients that I work with one on one or inside of our transformation coaching programs or inside of our digital programs, anytime I talk about alcohol, I say everyone’s unique, right? Because here’s the thing, not everybody drinks the same amount, you know? It’s not like everybody sits down at dinner and has two beers, right? That’s not always the case. We have to take a look at it from an individual perspective. Just like I preach with everything else, right? Diet workouts, cardio, everything has to be tailored to you as an individual. If you’re somebody who drinks excessively every night, obviously we need to start cutting back. If you’re someone who only drinks excessively once a month, then it may not be that big a deal. We have to take a look at your unique situation.

Couple more rules of thumb. If you’re a wine drinker, red wine is going to be your better choice because white wine has more sugar. Typically, if you’re a beer drinker, light beer is going to be your best choice, the heavier IPA [inaudible] and like the Guinness and stuff like that is, you know, going to come with heavier amounts of calories. You gotta be aware of that liquor, uh, and spirits, the best choices, a clear liquor or clear spirit, uh, the top two or tequila and vodka. It’s funny because tequila is often associated with, you know, hardcore partying and you know, somebody trying to get really drunk. But in reality, there’s some very easy-to-make drinks that are low calorie, using tequila as the primary liquor; and I highly suggest you take a look at vodka as well.

So if you’re into those, those are going to be your two best choices. Um, avoid as much as possible. Heavy calorie mixers, margarita mix, regular sodas, you know, the fancy drinks that are just that– they taste amazing but they’re just packed with sugar. Those are things you’re going to want to avoid if you’re trying to lose body fat. Why? Yes, could you technically drink those and track the calories and see some progress? For sure. It’s just gonna make your life so much harder though I would much rather have you make a few sacrifices with what you put in your drink and lower calories that way, over having to cut out alcohol altogether.

Windup

Overall, it’s important just to be aware of the habits that you have around drinking. So if you find yourself feeling really crappy the next day, not able to get your workouts in, and your appetite is out of control, you’re not getting enough sleep. Once again, we just have to dissect what alcohol is really doing to you from a lifestyle perspective, from a habits and routines perspective. And is it leading to poor habits, right? Is it leading to things that are just not going to serve you long term for your fitness goals?

People always ask me what I do, and I say, look, you know, I’m not a big drinker. Never have been. Uh, probably never will be. So I don’t struggle with keeping alcohol very moderate. When I do drink, which is probably on average once a month, once every six weeks. I’m a big Moscow mule guy. It’s, it’s not the lowest calorie drink by any means, but since I’m not a big drinker, I don’t really worry about it because I only drink probably two or three once every six to eight weeks on average and that doesn’t really impact my lifestyle, my fitness goals or anything like that.

So that is my 2 cents on alcohol. I hope that this gives you some insight into not only how to approach alcohol from a fat loss standpoint, but just an overall health standpoint as well. Because let’s face it, you know, looking great naked is just part of the equation. It’s awesome. It’s a great thing. Being lean is phenomenal. It’s great for health, it’s great for confidence, it’s great for just overall enjoyment of life, but if we’re not healthy, we’re not taking care of the internal side of things then or missing half the equation, and alcohol can obviously lead to some detrimental health issues. So let’s just keep that in mind as we move forward into 2020 where your alcohol intake is, what habits and routines is it serving or leading to, and how can we make your health a priority as well as your fat loss goals more of a reality.

I had a lot of info jam-packed ready to go for you, and hopefully, the alcohol subject gave you some insight into my thoughts but wanted to give you something to consider because I get this question almost every week.

If you want to get to know more about how to lose the weight and keep it off, we highly recommend a valuable guide called the Look Good Naked Guide, that is a free program designed to give you all the tools necessary to get started. Download it Here.

As always, I just want to say thank you so much for taking the time to read. I hope you enjoyed it. I hope it provided some insight and some value for you today would love it if you subscribed to the show, left us a rating and review.

>>>Click here to Listen to this Podcast Recording<<<

Over Training or Over-Life?

Josiah Novak

If you spend enough time around any popular fitness forum, read any fitness magazine, or watch youtube videos you are bound to stumble upon the concept of “Overtraining”. First, we will examine what coaches and science classify as overtraining and then we will uncover whether this is a concept that applies to regular hard-working gym-goers like yourself.

First let’s examine the concept of overtraining. Somewhere many Olympiads ago foreign coaches testing their athletes with brutal two a day sessions and aggressive Bulgarian squat cycles uncovered the concept that the body can only tolerate a certain degree of working out before it would eventually begin to rebel via overuse injuries, decreased performance, or other negative biofeedback & symptoms (such as changes in body temperature, sleep disturbances etc.). However, let’s remember this occurred within the framework of perfectly monitored conditions with athletes whose full time job is just to train, recover, and optimize their life solely for the sake of lifting performance. Unfortunately, this concept of “overtraining” wasn’t created in the lab of a stressful white collar desk job, a strenuous manual labor job, or the parent who can barely make it to the gym in time before the child care desk closes. So then why do symptoms of overtraining occur in a population of individuals like yourself who aren’t working out 14 times per week? The answer – LIFE STRESS.

Our bodies were programmed thousands of years ago to manage acute physical stress or trauma. If there was no food around, or some beastly animal happened to find where you were camping we would face very intermittent stressful situations where we would likely either a) escape or b) die. In modern day society we face what scientists and doctors consider to be chronic stressors – too many TPS reports from our boss, kids not sleeping through the night, paying the bills on time, or telling little Timmy to stop playing video games. These are problems, stressors, and stimuli that simply didn’t exist thousands of years ago, nor did they exist within the social vacuum of an athlete’s training camp. Combine this with the fact that a challenging workout is physiologically stressful in an acute (short-lived) manner (albeit the good kind) and we have a recipe for limited recovery capacity. Whether we like it or not we are still largely biologically identical to our ancestors and this happens to backfire within the context of balancing work, life and training.

Did I lose you somewhere in the science between life stress and TPS reports? Don’t worry – here’s an easy way to break things down- Think of your total volume of stress like a bank account. While individual tolerances and savings thresholds may vary we walk into the week with a set amount of “cash flow” or, in this case “stress flow”, along with a set amount of recovery. To keep your account balanced you need to carefully monitor the outputs or stressors drawing from the account, and the inputs or personal recovery investments you are making into the account. Maintaining this fine balance it what allows some to train more than others over the course of weeks, months and years. Compound this over time and you’ve got a recipe for continued progress.  

If you find yourself struggling to recover from your weekly workouts begin to ask yourself – have I balanced my account? Are my life stressors + training stressors exceeding my capacity to recover? If so, we need to implement more tools for recovery: sleep, nutrition, meditation, breathing, soft tissue work, or any other activity that primes the “rest and digest” response in your body (also known as the “parasympathetic”). Keep a close eye on your progress (weight lifted, repetitions performed, and workout time) as well as a general awareness for your current life demands outside of the gym. There’s a chance your workout routine doesn’t have you over-trained. You may just be overloaded in life.

 

– Sam Miller 

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If It Fits Your Health (Do It)

Josiah Novak - Author of Diets Suck

Have you ever woken up after a day full of eating all sorts of food (some good and some junk) feeling absolutely miserable? I’m not talking about feeling guilty (even though that’s part of it). I’m talking about actually feeling physically ill. Maybe it’s stomach pains or maybe it’s a headache. Even worse maybe you feel a cold coming on or a sore throat from all the excess sodium you consumed. As soon as your eyes open, you know all that food was a bad idea.

Well, I’ve woken up like that before. And to be honest I’ve felt crappy due to my diet choices many times. It’s not a fun feeling waking up and immediately knowing the day ahead is going to be a tough one because I’m physically not up to par. It’s truly a motivation killer to realize that getting through the day’s activities is going to be an uphill battle from the start.

At times we don’t even realize that our lack of energy or enthusiasm for the day is due to our diet choices. We eat like total crap on a Sunday and wake up wondering why Monday is so daunting. It’s no wonder that getting to the gym feels like an impossible task when our bodies hurt and our energy is on zero due to all the stress we put our digestion system through.

This is such an important topic. I hope that you walk away from reading this with a better understanding of where we’ve gone wrong with nutrition as it relates to our health, fitness levels, muscle and fat loss goals, and our enjoyment of life. I’m just as guilty as the next person of making huge mistakes with my personal nutrition at times over the years. I’m writing this blog to open your eyes to how unbelievably powerful our eating habits can be.

 

If you google “The Best Diet to Lose Fat” be prepared for an overload of information. Hundreds of diets, meal plans and products will be shoved down your throat before you even start eating. You’ll be stuck in an avalanche of product pushers, strict meal plans, and the latest and greatest diet strategies. Save yourself the trouble and forego the google machine. Today’s world is truly the most confusing it’ss ever been when it comes to diet and nutrition. It’s also a battlefield between who’s right and who’s wrong when it comes to their diet “methods”. The truth is that nutrition is actually quite simple so there’s hope, but it’s going to take some work.

The common theme for most online “gurus” or “coaches” is to take on clients and start them off on a very strict meal plan. They tell them what to eat and when to eat it each day to lose fat, build a toned body, and feel great. This is all based off their “expert” analysis of the client’s needs and goals. The client comes to them with the attitude of “tell me what to eat and when because I don’t want to think about it” so it makes perfect sense that these coaches cater to the clients demands. The client jumps on the meal plan and immediately starts to see results. This may go on for a month or maybe a few months before the client realizes that it’s just not sustainable for them to eat the same foods day in and day out. They start to get irritable and they feel ashamed when they report to their coach that they’ve cheated on their diet again and again. After all, following a meal plan is what all the top fitness competitors do so it’s the best way to get in great shape…right? Wrong.

Strict meal plans that limit your food choices and force you into a set regimen each day can cause more harm than good long term. It’s been proven that meal plans can set people up for a terrible relationship with food, create a desire to binge, and severely limit the healthy aspects of a diet full of variety. Not to mention, it’s pretty hard to live an enjoyable life when you have to follow a meal plan to reach your goals. Most people who follow a strict meal plan end up reverting back to their old diet habits once they realize that their meal plan just isn’t feasible for their lifestyle.

For the longest time, if you wanted to lose weight or build muscle you would hire a coach or nutritionist and they would immediately put you on a meal plan. However, after many years of severe restriction, the fitness industry fought back.

Enter: If It Fits Your Macros.

Counting calories has been around for quite some time. Arnold Schwarzenegger was known to count calories (and he actually had a pretty well rounded diet plan). However, counting calories has recently made a huge comeback. It’s gone one step further too. We know now that it’s not just about calories. It’s about the type of calories you eat too. Having the right amount of protein, carbs and fats in your diet is crucial for overall health and wellness. We all have our unique needs when it comes to these nutrients so just counting calories won’t cut it. We need to figure out where we get our food from so tracking macros has become all the rage.

However, as we’ve seen in the past, the fitness industry can take a good idea and turn it into a very bad one very quickly. Macro counting has been dubbed IIFYM (If It Fits Your Macros) because the new rule of thumb (keep in mind this is in response to the strict meal plans) is that you can ANYTHING you want as long as it fits your daily numbers for protein carbs and fats.

This could literally mean eating ice cream every day along with some candy because it fits your daily numbers. Ok confession time. I’ve been known to promote this type of eating over the past couple years. Why? Well because I count macros each day and my mind was blown a few years ago when I dieted down to 5% body fat eating ice cream just about every day before bed. Was this a healthy approach? Heck no! I would wake up and hit the toilet with a very irritable bowel movement just about every day. I didn’t feel great every day because I was eating way too much junk food simply because it fit my macros. I was rebelling against the severe restrictions of meal plans (an understandable reaction) but I wasn’t paying attention to my health.

Knowing how much food we eat is very crucial to our long term success when it comes to taking care of our health and feeling/looking great! However, simply applying numbers to our day and eating whatever we can fit in is not the healthiest choice. We’ve taken a great concept (counting macros) and turned it into a cult following. It’s become all about what sort of junk food concoction we can create that fits our macro needs. Health and feeling awesome is secondary to hitting perfect numbers with as much variety as possible. We forget to take into account whether or not we are getting enough vitamins and minerals. We ignore how our bodies feel when we fit in some McDonalds simply because it fits our macros. This is a dangerous path to go down.

If you’re still reading this…it’s not too late.

You might be confused at this point and that’s normal. It’s a very confusing topic for most people! However, let me simplify it for you. I’m very fortunate that I was born with the strong desire to learn as much as possible. Plus, I’ve been super lucky to be surrounded with very smart people who have helped me craft my current approach to nutrition and now it’s my job to pass along that help to you.

I want to walk you through my approach with my clients when it comes to setting up a successful nutrition strategy. Some of you reading this will be more advanced than others, but I still think its important to cover the basics as a refresher. You’ll be pretty amazed to see that we often forget about the basics.

Let’s say I have a married couple come to me looking to lose fat. They aren’t happy with their appearance and how they can’t seem to get motivated to get in shape. They’ve been eating a ton of food and not working out for about 6 months. They’ve tried all sorts of diets but nothing seems to work. We won’t address their workout plan in this blog, but let’s jump into the diet strategy.

First things first, I want to know what they’re eating now. I would like John and Jane Doe to write down everything they eat for a few days and report those food journals to me. Now, I would also keep in mind that working with a coach can cause some food journals to look better than an average day so I would also ask them to write down exactly what they ate (if they can remember) the days leading up to working with me. This gives me an accurate idea of what their nutrition looks like now so that we can start to implement new habits.

So, the next logical step is to write a meal plan right? Wrong. Taking a client from zero to 100 in a day isn’t realistic. We need to implement good habits one at a time while building momentum to increase motivation.

One of the first habits I want people to implement is to avoid drinking their calories as much as possible. I’m referring to sodas, sugary drinks and the lovely Starbucks menu that is jam packed full of sugar and high calorie drinks. Having a diet soda here and there down the road is fine, but for now I would suggest that John and Jane stick to water, coffee sweetened with Truvia, and tea. If my clients enjoy alcohol consumption, I would recommend cutting out alcohol for the initial portion of the plan. I also want to educate them on how alcohol works. If cutting out alcohol completely isn’t an option due to work demands or upcoming events — I would outline a simple strategy to control their alcohol intake.

While we implement the liquid habits, I also want my clients to start to track what they are eating in an app or food journal. Tracking calories and macros for a period of time can truly be eye opening. Most people severely underestimate their calorie intake. It’s important to gain the knowledge and information so that we are educated on what we are putting into our bodies.

The next habit I like clients to utilize is getting 2–3 servings of green veggies and 1–2 servings of fruits per day. Obviously I want my clients to listen to their bodies and take note of how they are feeling after they eat certain foods. Most people feel a lot better after getting into the fruits and veggies habit due to increase in fiber and vitamins and minerals. Eating more of these amazing nutrients will also help curb cravings and help most people feel more satisfied. Health is our number one priority and fruits and veggies are a tremendous source of health benefits.

Now comes the only time that I utilize meal plans. I never instruct my clients to follow an exact meal plan each and every day. However, it can help to write out a “perfect” day of eating a wide of variety of healthy foods to show clients how it can be done. This usually means 3–4 meals that contain a tremendous amount of nutrients but also provide the client with meal options that could be eaten at a restaurant if needed. To make things even easier, I like to provide my clients with 3 or 4 options at each meal to ensure that they never feel tied down to a meal plan. Plus, I want my clients to continue to track what they eat so they can learn how much food they are consuming and they can plug other foods in to ensure they are getting adequate variety.

Educating ourselves on how much food we need each day can help guide our food choices. Learning to eat properly for health and wellness takes time. Plus, there may be goals or events coming up that require us to change course and implement new strategies. There may be times where our bodies just aren’t feeling right and we need to make changes to our nutrition to ensure we feel our best at all times.

This leads me to the most important point that we all need to understand. If we aren’t feeling right, something needs to change and often times it’s our eating habits. Having a meal plan or macro numbers to hit every day doesn’t take our health and how we feel into consideration. If we are feeling overly full at a certain caloric intake then we probably don’t need that many calories. If our energy is terrible on low carbs and we feel super weak, then we probably need to add some carbs into our diet. The same can be said for low-fat. If we try out a keto diet, but we just don’t feel great — then it’s not the diet for you!

I hope this blog sheds some light on nutrition. I’ve made all the mistakes so want to help you avoid them if possible! There is no one-size-fits-all method that works for everyone. If that existed then this blog wouldn’t be necessary. You have to find a strategy that you can follow every day and make small tweaks to as your goals change. Going from binging every 3 days to eating “clean” meal plan is not a tweak. That’s an eating disorder and we need to stop creating more problems for ourselves by going from one extreme to the next.

 

Let’s stop eating things if they fit your macros — instead let’s eat things if they fit your social, taste,  mental and physical health (IIFYH).

I’m always here to help — just email me josiah@thetruetransformation.com or visit www.thetruetransformation.com/start-here to get started on your own journey today!

 

Train with free weights or your body weight?

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Top 5 mistakes every gym member makes

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Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Donec pretium, tortor vitae porttitor suscipit, sapien purus aliquet risus, eu finibus arcu ante nec risus. Mauris porta a massa sed consectetur. Fusce porta, quam sit amet tincidunt facilisis, ipsum enim semper nunc, ut sodales ipsum lectus eget dolor. Duis non dapibus elit. Pellentesque habitant morbi tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas. Donec vel leo egestas, finibus felis ac, luctus felis. Nunc mattis elementum ullamcorper. Vivamus eros mi, dapibus sed enim quis, ullamcorper eleifend nunc. Pellentesque ex eros, venenatis in enim nec, facilisis tincidunt sapien. Quisque porttitor, urna a venenatis eleifend, lacus leo tempus elit, et rutrum nisi libero pulvinar ante. Vestibulum faucibus odio eget tellus maximus vestibulum. In eget eros et massa blandit sagittis. Nullam hendrerit, metus eget varius scelerisque, nisl urna venenatis odio, pharetra pharetra lectus justo aliquet quam.

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